herniation of large intestine at stoma site

by Tanya
(South Australia)

Hello, I have an Ileostomy and now next to my stoma where the 'blowhole' is, part of the large intestine has herniated out and is about double the size of the stoma. The Stoma Nurse has seen it and didn't seem to think it was a big issue but I just wanted to check if anyone else has had such an experience? I have been told by other medical staff before that something is not a big deal when in fact it is so just wanted to get some other opinions......thanks.......Tanya


Tanya :-)
South Australia
Email: tancas2 @ hotmail.com
Age: 32 years old. (Born 1979)
Bowel Rupture and Emergency Bowel Resection, Blood Transfusion and Ileostomy in the very early hours of 4 December 2011. (That was my 7th ambulance trip to hospital that year and ever!)
Consequently diagnosed with Crohn's 8 December 2011.
Stomach ulcer January 2012. (Don't listen to dr's who say ibuprofen is safe in suppository form lol!)
Chronic symptoms since approx. 2007 (dismissed as IBS), but looking back Mum and I remember strange bowel issues in early childhood so I have possibly had Crohns for a very long time (I've always had a very high plain threshold).
Several extended family members with IBD.
Very grateful to have survived and to finally have an answer to my health concerns but still have tough days.
Very excited about Crohns support group starting in South Australia on 12 April 2012

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herniation of large intestine at stoma site NEW
by: Lydia D.

I was diagnosed at 32 and, like yourself, had symptoms all the way through my childhood/teen/student/etc. days. I was also diagnosed with psychosomatic abdominal pain. On diagnosis it was clear that I needed to have my colon removed as it resembled a melted twisted drainpipe. My Crohn's was severe and refractory and it had obviously been going on for some time.

A hernia is only considered to be an issue when it hurts. If it does start to hurt, then you might find that it is better to stand and gently press on the abdomen to relieve the pain, rather than to bend forward, which will squash the trapped intestine even more.

As Peter pointed out, if you have a permanent ileostomy, then the herniation will involve the small intestine or other organs because the colon has been removed. However, they might have given you a temporary ileostomy with part of your colon retained after the resection. Please check this.

There may be a problem with the appliance staying on your abdomen if the hernia gets larger. If your quality of life starts to decrease significantly, e.g. you have severe pain, the base plate frequently leaks, then you will need an operation. In the meantime, do not lift heavy objects (more than 5 - 10 kg) and remember to bend the knees and keep the back straight.

Stay clear of Ibuprofen and Aspirin with Crohn's - we have enough intestinal damage. The idiocy of some doctors knows no boundaries. Where do they think that rectal Aspirin goes? For the same reason, we should not use Aspirin patches.

If you are worried about the hernia, you can always get a second opinion from a(nother) surgeon.


Herniation with Ileostomy? NEW
by: Peter Bray

Unless yours is a looped, temporary ileostomy, you would NOT have any part of your large intestine still intact, that's why it's called an ileostomy, your ileum protrudes through the stoma and all your waste exits from there...upstream from that is your small intestine...if your anus is still functioning, then you have a looped, temporary ileostomy with the possibility of a later reconnection of your colon back into the waste stream IF it heals...

The question is, why do you have a herniation at all? I don't know...I would seek out a second opinion...half-baked staff answers only leave YOU as the recipient of ignorant staff's response---

PetrBray@AOL.com
Peter Bray, Benicia, CA

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